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LIXIL and Tohoku University unveil toilet lighting system that works even in blackouts

August 21, 2015

LIXIL and Tohoku University unveil toilet lighting system that works even in blackouts

JFS
Friday 21 August 2015

Since July 2014, LIXIL, a Japanese living and housing solutions company, and Tohoku University, have been conducting research to develop the “Zero Energy Toilet (ZET),” which allows people to use toilets comfortably even in times of disaster.

As part of the study, on June 2, 2015, they announced the development of a zero-energy lighting system that utilizes electricity generated from the power of water flushing down the toilet bowl to light the room.

In times of disaster, if the external power supply is disrupted, but water and sewerage systems are not extensively damaged, the new system can provide light to the washroom and make it usable at night, by converting the hydropower energy of the flushing water into electricity for lighting.

The system is supplemented by power storage, high-efficiency LED lights, and power supply control circuits. In addition, the researchers developed a new type of LED lighting that takes advantage of the “Purkinje effect,” a phenomenon that occurs at low light intensity, where blue objects reflect short-wavelength light and appear to be brighter than red objects that reflect long-wavelength light.

Read more at Eco-Business.

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